Public profile: Maria Clippingdale

Maria Clippingdale -19.80sc

Maria Clippingdale

Maria Clippingdale's activity stream


  • published Carrotmob Newsletter in Carrotmob 2016-11-22 16:18:50 +1100

    Carrotmob Newsletter

    Carrots

    Carrotmob November 2016
    View in browser

    Thanks for being part of Carrotmob
    Carrotmob

    We’re on a mission to encourage takeaway food businesses in Hobart to provide more sustainable takeaway packaging and utensil options and embolden their customers to BYO packaging (which is the best option). We're using the Carrotmob approach – and encouraging people to come together in a collective way to support and reward positive environmental change in their communities using the ‘carrot’ instead of the stick. We're using you, our fantastic network of thousands of people, to support food retailers in Hobart who switch away from plastic takeaway packaging to compostable options. Thanks to everyone who has supported our switchers, we hope to introduce you to more in the coming weeks.

    Chennai Bismi Kitchen - our first switcher
    Chennai Bismi Kitchen

    Chennai Bismi Kitchen at 127 Liverpool street was our first switcher. Please mob them with *appreciation* to support our Carrotmob campaign. They have joined Carrotmob and removed the plastic takeaway packaging from their Liverpool Street shop and Salamanca stall and switched to compostable options. They are also more than happy for people to BYO packaging. Please reward them by visiting their yummy restaurant (their Dosa is like nothing on this Earth) and don't forget to mention Carrotmob, so they know their effort was noticed. 

    Macquarie Grocer
    Macquarie Grocer for Carrotmob

    Our newest Carrotmob switcher is the Macquarie Grocer on the corner of Darcy St in South Hobart. What a fantastic bunch of hard working young Tasmanians to support. In recent times, they have begun to provide more sustainable packaging and through Carrotmob Hobart they have switched away from even more plastic items, to compostable options. They are more than happy for people to BYO packaging. Please reward them by tasting their yummy takeaway food and coffee and don't forget to mention Carrotmob, so they know their effort was *appreciated*.  

    Community led
    Map of compostable takeaway shops

    As we've walked the streets looking for retailers to join Carrotmob we've found that a large percentage have already switched to compostable packaging, particularly paper, cardboard and sugarcane pulp packaging, but also compostable plastic products. Both Kingborough and the City of Hobart are investigating a phase out of all plastic takeaway packaging by around 2020! Please show your support for businesses as they switch and lead the way so that our local Governments have the bravery to implement such progressive phase-outs. We've started making a map of shops that have moved away from traditional plastic packaging and we'd love your help. 

    Where does your takeaway packaging go?
    Rubbish bin

    Did you know that the vast majority of plastic packaging we Tasmanians use ends up buried in landfill sites? We are not unusual, globally, of the 80 million tonnes of plastic packaging produced each year, only 5% is retained for subsequent use (Ellen MacArthur Foundation). It's no wonder businesses are moving to compostable plastics where they can. Based on our research, we think compostable plastic is better than traditional plastic. Not only does it reduce our reliance on non-renewable resources, use less toxic chemicals and generally come from companies with ethical processes, it also breaks down a lot faster than traditional plastics in the environment. Moving to compostable plastics will also help Councils understand our need for food and greenwaste collection services. 

    One bin!
    One rubbish bin per house

    Do you ever look in the compostables, recycling and landfill bins, perched together at festivals and events and wonder why they all get filled with the same things?  It's because it's downright difficult to know which item goes where.

    Dare we think outside the confusing box we've got ourselves into for just one moment and dream about living in a World where:

    * waste disposal is as simple as one bin, a compost bin, taken locally for processing;

    * we reuse everything;

    * plastics that can no longer be used are all compostable;

    * deposit schemes encourage people to return their glass jars and sauce bottles, building materials, batteries, globes, tins of paint, etc for targeted recycling;

    * tax incentives exist for people to fix broken items like washing machines instead of throwing them away;

    * textiles are made from natural fibres like hemp, so micro plastics don't fill our oceans; and

    * all our paper and plastics are composted instead of being sent out of sight at enormous economic, environmental and social costs?


    You're allowed to BYO
    BYO packaging

    All around Hobart, businesses are encouraging people to BYO plate, fork and mug. YES it is OK, legal and cool to BYO, as long as you take care and ensure your containers are clean. According to the City of Hobart, "It is strictly an individual business decision for a proprietor to choose to go down this path by allowing customers to bring in their own mugs/bowls, etc. to be filled as part of a takeaway sale".  Find ways to have your reusable packaging at the ready. Serious, it's not impossible, you just need to plan ahead and find clever products (like those pictured from Teros) and clever ways to remember.


    Carrotmob is proudly funded by Sustainable Living Tasmania and the City of Hobart Dr Edward Hall Environment Grant program. 
    Sustainable Living Tasmania logoCity of Hobart logo

  • published You're allowed to BYO in Set yourself up BYO style 2016-11-07 12:01:19 +1100

    You're allowed to BYO

    All around Hobart, businesses like Frankies Empire in Elizabeth Street (thanks for the yummy photo) are encouraging people to BYO plate, fork and cup. YES it is OK, legal and cool to BYO, as long as you take care and ensure that your containers are clean. City of Hobart Environmental Health Manager Mark Dwyer provided us with clarification to ensure that there is no confusion.  

    Read more

  • published Going even further in The leaders of the pack 2016-11-05 06:46:46 +1100

    Going even further

    This week we had a chat with David Stephen, as he busied himself at the local Picnic Basket cafe. He is a gardener extraordinaire and has been experimenting with growing vegetables for many years. David's latest area of interest is coffee grounds, which according to him are better for the garden than blood and bone. He is currently helping the cafe to compost their food scraps, including coffee grounds and egg shells on site and now hosts a mini community garden, sustained by the compost he produces. 

    Read more

  • followed Are you interested in switching? 2016-10-20 11:02:50 +1100

    Are you interested in switching?

    Throughout November and December we are going to use our vast social media reach, our monthly newsletter and our annual 
    Sustainable Living Festival (with an estimated 10,000 visitors expected) to prompt our network to support retailers in Hobart who switch to compostable takeaway packaging. 

    We are going to use the Carrotmob approach – and encourage our Sustainable Living Tasmania network of thousands of people to come together in a collective way to support and reward food retailers in Hobart that switch away from plastic takeaway packaging to compostable options.

    Read more

  • published Takeaway packaging recycling in Carrotmob 2016-11-25 12:58:21 +1100

    Takeaway packaging recycling

    Packaging types

    Collected for recycling

    End of life destination for majority of items

    Plastic and compostable plastic

         

     coffee_lids_100px.jpg

    Coffee cup lids

    X

    Landfill

     plasticcup_100px.jpg

    Cups

    X

    Landfill

     plastic_cup_tray_100px.jpg

    Cup trays

    X

    Landfill

     container_100px.jpg

    Large takeaway food containers

    Via kerbside

    Sent for recycling

     lid_100px.jpg

    Takeaway food lids

    X

    Landfill

     clam_100px.jpg

    Clamshells large

    Via kerbside

    Sent for recycling

     smal_tubs_100px.jpg

    Small plastic containers

    X

    Landfill

     straws_100px.jpg

    Straws

    X

    Landfill

     cutlery_100px.jpg

    Cutlery

    X

    Landfill

     plasticbag_100px.jpg

    Bags and film

    Via Coles

    Recycled if put in the bin at major supermarkets (Coles takes all plastic film packaging, not just shopping bags)

     bottle_100px.jpg

    Plastic drink bottles

    Via kerbside

    Sent for recycling (although 32% are sent to landfill)

     lids_100px.jpg

    Plastic drink bottle lids

    X

    Landfill

     breadtags_100px.jpg

    Bag tags

    X

    Landfill

    Paper, cardboard, bio cane, etc.**

         

     cup_100px.jpg

    Cups (always lined with plastic film)

    X

    Landfill

     tray_100px.jpgcane_plate_100px.jpg

    Takeaway bases

    X**

    Landfill (but can be composted at home or through a food waste collection service)

     clamshell_100px.jpg

    Clamshells

    X

    Landfill

     milk_100px.jpg

    Milk drinks

    Via kerbside

    Sent for recycling

    Polystyrene

         

     polystyrene_100px.jpg

    Cups

    X

    Landfill

     

    Takeaway bases (and lids)

    X

    Landfill

     

    Clamshells

    X

    Landfill

    Other

         

     gloves_100px.jpg

    Rubber and plastic gloves used to make all salad sandwiches

    X

    Landfill

     Baby_snacks_100px.jpg

     Baby snacks

     X

     Landfill

    Aluminium

         

     aluminium_base_100px.jpg

    Takeaway bases

    Via kerbside

    Sent for recycling

     cans_100px.jpg

    Soft drink cans

    Via kerbside

    Sent for recycling

     chip_packets_100px.jpg

    Chip packets

    X

    Landfill

    Glass

         

     bottles_100px.jpg

    Soft drink, juice, wine and beer bottles

    X

    Over the last five years the majority of our kerbside-recycling glass has been sent to landfill. More and more it is now being used in bricks and road base as a sand substitute (instead of being sent to landfill). Re-using our bottles would be better. 

    Long life milk and juice boxes 

         
    tetrapak_200px.jpg

    These are made from paper, plastic and aluminium combined

    X

    Landfill

     

     


  • posted about Take action on Facebook 2016-10-20 10:34:25 +1100
    A campaign to collectively support food retailers in Hobart who switch away from plastic takeaway packaging.

    Take action

    Sign up and we'll keep you in the loop about Carrotmob Hobart over the coming months. We'll let you know the businesses that agree to switch and about any events we hold to support their fantastic decision. Also keep at eye on our #Carrotmob Hobart website and Facebook.

    Sign up

  • followed Chennai Bismi - our first switcher 2016-10-18 19:02:19 +1100

    Chennai Bismi - our first switcher

    Yay! Chennai Bismi Kitchen at 127 Liverpool street is our first switcher. Please mob them with *appreciation* to support our Carrotmob campaign. They have just joined Carrotmob and removed all of their traditional plastic takeaway packaging from their Liverpool Street shop and switched to compostable options. Please reward them by visiting their yummy restaurant... don't forget to mention Carrotmob, so they know their effort was *appreciated*. 

     

    Read more

  • published Who to mob? in Carrotmob 2016-09-24 10:45:54 +1000

    Who to mob?

    Macquarie Grocer - our second switcher
    Posted by · October 28, 2016 9:30 AM

    Chennai Bismi - our first switcher
    Posted by · October 18, 2016 1:07 PM · 1 reaction

    People power for positive change
    Posted by · October 18, 2016 12:44 PM

    See all posts

  • published Code of conduct in Strategy and reporting 2016-07-16 17:22:39 +1000

    Code of conduct

    Our vision - action, expertise, excellence, sensible, not just words.

    We recognise that Education for Sustainable Development is about the way we work as much as a topic of focus. As a network, we recognise the benefits of collaborative gain.

    We understand that the RCE platform provides dedicated organisations with the opportunity to improve sustainability outcomes and to promote expertise in ESD.

    We believe that by adopting the following principles we will be better able to achieve our Mission and Objectives.

    Scottish example


  • published General members in The RCE Tas network 2016-07-16 16:32:09 +1000

  • published Why choose a small home in small homes 2016-05-24 12:12:48 +1000

    Why choose a small home

    Sustainable building practices are one of the most important and often overlooked aspects of sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme have estimated that buildings are responsible for as much as one third of total greenhouse emissions globally. Although there have been some top-down approaches from policy makers to address this, there is always more that can be done. A small, comfortable, energy efficient home built with eco-friendly techniques is a simple way to reduce your environmental impact immediately and reduce your energy and water use over the long term.

    Read more

  • commented on Contact 2016-06-14 10:19:28 +1000
    Hello Cathy,

    Can you please see if Janine can follow this up and complete the path and cc crm@slt.org.au

    Thanks

    Maria

    Contact

    We'd love to hear from you, send us a message using the box below.

    Or pop in and visit us between 9am - 5pm, Monday - Thursday (closed on Fridays)

    Address: 1st floor, 71 Murray Street, Hobart TAS 7000 (map)

    Or call us on (03) 6234 5566

    We have a monthly newsletter full of offers, stories and upcoming activities - subscribe here

     

    Send

  • published Choosing a hot water system in Tips 2015-07-16 17:40:35 +1000

    Choosing a hot water system

    A well insulated solar hot water system in Tasmania should be able to meet 50-75% of hot water needs in winter and all hot water needs in summer. Find out more about the various hot water heating options available and consider the location of your cylinder before you install a new system.

    Read more

  • Find a heater that suits your home and lifestyle

    Heating is the largest energy user in the average Tasmanian home so it is important to find out which form of heating is best for your home and your situation. There are a number of resources available to help you make the best home heating choices.

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  • published Reuse waste water in Tips 2015-06-23 14:03:00 +1000

    Reuse waste water

    Waste water from the kitchen (sinks and dishwashers), laundry (washing machines, troughs) or bathroom (showers, baths and hand basins) is called Greywater. It can be reused to water your lawn or garden. 

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  • published Tassievore Eat Local Challenge in News 2015-06-17 13:21:33 +1000

    Tassievore Eat Local Challenge

    The Tassievore Eat Local Challenge is all about encouraging Tasmanians to enjoy local produce, support local businesses and grow some fruit and vegetables. The 2015 challenge was a great success with hundreds of Tasmanians participating and focusing their attention on discovering Tasmanian products and shops that support local producers.

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  • published Installing a solar hot water system? in Tips 2015-06-10 11:30:06 +1000

    Installing a solar hot water system?

    A solar hot water system will provide almost all hot water needs in summer, so it is preferable to optimise the collector slope to catch the winter sun. This means mounting the collector at an angle of 60º to 70º. Also, the collector should ideally face north in a position where it is not shaded for the major part of the day. 

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