Why heat pumps?

Heat pumps (also known as reverse cycle air conditioners) are by far the most efficient form of electric heating, achieving efficiencies at least three times greater than other heaters. Read our fact sheet on heat pumps.

Heat pumps are also the most cost effective way of utilising the sun's energy for most Tasmanian households. Find out more about cost effective solar energy for Hobart.

Below is a comparison of heater types, calculated to heat a typical Tasmanian living area to give the best ‘apples-to-apples’ comparison possible:

 

Heat pump

Other hardwired electric heater

Plug-in electric heater

Wood heater (highly efficient model)

Natural gas (pipe connection)

LPG (bottles)

Efficiency (%)

300%

98%

98%

77%

81%

81%

Total cost averaged over 10 years ($/year)

$561

$1,108

$1,691

$580

$1,022

$1,945

Greenhouse gas emissions (kg CO2-eq/year)

471

1,526

1,526

from 76 up to 6,888 [1]

1,483

1,730

Ease of use

Easy

Easy

Easy

Difficult [2]

Easy

Easy

No local air pollution

Yes

Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Can also provide cooling

Yes No No No No No

Fuel consumption per year

2,049 kWh 6,633 kWh 6,633 kWh 1.9 tonnes 10.2 MJ 1156 L

Fuel price

15.2c/kWh 15.2c/kWh 25.2c/kWh $150/tonne $0.02844/MJ $1.51/L

Energy consumption (kWh/year)

1,707 6,633 6,633 8,398 8,025 8,025

Energy price (c/kWh)

15.20c 15.20c 25.20c 3.33c 10.24c 21.74c

Running cost ($/year)

$311 $1,008 $1,671 $280 $822 $1,745

Upfront purchase & installation cost ($)

$2,500 $1,000 $200 $3,000 $2,000 $2,000

Disclaimer: These figures are based on research by Sustainable Living Tasmania as at September 2015 and are based on heating on an averaged size home and a range of commercially available heaters.

Heat pump numbers were updated December 2015 with a more conservative estimate of heat pump efficiency.

[1] Depends on whether trees are replaced or not.

[2] Requires ordering, stacking, splitting and carrying wood; setting and lighting fire; and cleaning out ash trap.